The Past, Present and Future of Long-Term Care Insurance

Original Article By Bruce Bamford, Broker/Owner of Bamford Long Term Care Financial Services LLC

The Past

Decades ago, facilities were established called skilled nursing homes.  They were designed to take care of people who could no longer stay in their homes due to health/aging reasons. Our Medicare program was never designed to pay for these costs.  Along came the insurance companies who developed a product called long-term care insurance. These early products were designed to help with costs at skilled nursing homes. As the years went by, more types of long-term care insurance products were developed for Assisted Living and In-Home Care facilities. Then came the costs of dementia/Alzheimer’s care.  The long-term care insurance started to incorporate that type of care to be paid from the policies. Dementia/Alzheimer’s was just a word 20 years ago and now it is an epidemic.  The #1 cause impoverishing our seniors today is the costs and care needed for these diseases. No one plans for this cost in planning for retirement and the average cost is around $250,000/each.

The Present

In the past 10 years, companies selling long-term care insurance have gone down from about 120 to 15 offering these products. Most major insurance companies have walked away, because they are paranoid of dementia long-term care costs that will be needed. How do you build an insurance product with an unknown end to this whole situation? Many who own long-term care insurance have also seen price increases over the past eight years. This is due to interest rates being at 1 and 2%. Also, with dementia being an epidemic, there are more claims paid out today for memory care than ever.  This is another reason that insurance companies have chosen to exit the market.

There are still some very good, quality long-term care insurance companies still selling products, but because the media has gone very quiet, the sales are down extremely from what they were 10 years ago. Today, Long Term Care Insurance is still an extremely important part of asset protection for all consumers and new products are being developed all the time.

The Future

The original design of long-term care insurance is called “Traditional”.  The new products that have been developed in the last decade are called asset-based or hybrid long-term care insurance. These products are combining life insurance or traditional annuities as the cash value part of the policy. The purpose of these new products is so consumers can get their money back if they do not use the coverage. However, as these new products are being developed the insurance companies have a lot of sales Buzz words that go with it to encourage consumers to purchase it and people need to know how to dissect these policies to see whether it’s really a good thing or not. Because these products are insuring you for both life insurance and long-term care insurance, the premiums can be a lot higher than the traditional type, which we call renting (traditional) vs owning (hybrids).

Conclusion

If a sales rep criticizes another company just to sell you their product, walk away!  Find someone who can explain the pros and cons of both types, traditional and hybrids. After dissecting policies for 20 years, they all have a purpose.

So, what are your alternatives? Spending all your hard-earned money on your care (skilled care today averages $120,000 a year) and applying for Medicaid?  What is Medicaid and who can get Medicaid? Do you have to be impoverished to qualify for Medicaid? If your considering LTC Insurance, please take the time to study it as you will be investing a lot of your money, but can truly be worth it.

Go from age 50 to 80 to learn Long Term Care by calling us at 360-943-9698. We have been offering FREE our 2 hr educational, no-sales classes for over 14 years.  If you go to  www.washingtonlawhelp.org and click on 60+ then “Long Term Care Assistance (copes, nursing homes, in home care” this is a good part of the course.

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